Agrimony - Thankfulness


Agrimonia, commonly known as Agrimony, is a genus of 12-15 species of perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the family Rosaceae, native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with one species also in Africa. The species grow to between 0.5–2 m tall, with interrupted pinnate leaves, and tiny yellow flowers borne on a single (usually un-branched) spike.

Agrimonia species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Grizzled Skipper (recorded on A. eupatoria) and Large Grizzled Skipper.

Agrimony has a long history of medicinal use. The English poet Michael Drayton once hailed it as an "all-heal", and through the ages it did seem to be a Panacea. The ancient Greeks used Agrimony to treat eye ailments, and it was made into brews to cure diarrhea and disorders of the gallbladder, liver, and kidneys. Anglo-Saxons made a solution from the leaves and seeds for healing wounds; this use continued through the Middle Ages and afterward, in a preparation called eau d'arquebusade, or "musket-shot water". Later, agrimony was prescribed for athlete's foot.

In the United States and Canada, and late into the 19th century, the plant was prescribed for many of these illnesses and more: for skin diseases, asthma, coughs, and gynecological complaints, and as a gargling solution for sore throats.

Recent authors identify Agrimony as a topical astringent for wounds, ulcers and sore throats and an astringent, bitter tonic, indicated for gastrointestinal and urinary problems such as indigestion, diarrhea and colitis, urinary tract infections, enuresis and incontinence and kidney and bladder gravel.

Although the plant has no idiopathic properties, tradition holds that when placed under a person's head, Agrimony will induce a deep sleep that will last until removed. furthermore it was and still is used by wiccans in herb craft to return spells to there sender and also for protection (its made into powder and placed around a home or dwelling, carried around by the person, or placed in a dream pillow).


Source, Images: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agrimonia

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